BRAIN HEALTH ASSESSMENT PRO

Why Measuring Brain Health Matters

You have an idea of how your brain is doing—some days, you feel “off” or have “brain fog,” while other days, you feel like you can take on the world. But how much better are you on your good days? Are lifestyle or health changes making a difference? That’s where brain health assessment comes in.

When was the last time you had a brain health assessment?

Likely never! Unless you have memory issues or dementia.

People fear dementia more than cancer or heart disease. Dementias like Alzheimer's are on the rise worldwide, more so in low and medium-income countries, where healthcare systems are least prepared to deal with this dramatic rise. People are living longer, but brain health is often lost in the discussion about physical health.

You have an annual health check-up to test your blood glucose, inflammation, lipids, thyroid function etc. but have you ever had a brain health assessment before (unless you had memory symptoms)?

Surprisingly, until now, there has not been a standardized method for measuring core brain functions, such as

  • memory
  • reasoning
  • verbal ability and
  • concentration

The Brain Health Assessment Pro helps solve this problem by providing a simple and scientifically validated test to measure and monitor your brain health.

Who Should Get A Brain Health Assessment Done?

Everyone!

Cognitive assessments are for everyonewhether you’re recovering from a brain injury, you feel your brain is not as rapid-fire as it was before or have been diagnosed with a mental health condition, or are simply seeking ways to maintain or optimize your brain’s performance, measuring your brain health will give you insights that enable you to take the steps you need to improve your quality of life.

You are at high risk of cognitive decline if you have the following conditions:

  • Brain Fog
  • Brain not as rapid fire
  • Anxiety
  • Diabetes And Pre-diabetes
  • Belly Fat
  • Fatty Liver
  • High Blood Pressure
  • PCOS
  • Heart Disease
  • Menopause
  • Parkinson's Disease
  • Autoimmune Conditions like Multiple Sclerosis, Psoriasis, Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Covid 19 Infection in the past (Long Covid)
  • Untreated mental health conditions
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Family history of dementia

Why guess when you can test?

The first step to managing your brain health is to measure it. Your brain decides everything you do. That is why it is hard to be objective about how well your brain is working. You don't know what you don't measure.

By putting a number to your estimate of how your brain is functioning, we can discover what is causing the good days in order to have more of them. Every activity in your daily life will be easier when your brain performs, from remembering where you parked your car to doing your taxes to achieving career success and having better relationships.

What does the test measure?

Below Is A Sample Report

What does the test measure?

PLANNING

Planning is the ability to sequence behaviour in an orderly fashion to reach specific goals.

This ability is often used in scenarios such as deciding the order of items to pack in the trunk of a car or organizing your schedule to effectively balance work, chores, and social life.

DEDUCTIVE REASONING

Deductive reasoning is the ability to apply rules to information in order to arrive at a logical conclusion.

This ability is often used in scenarios such as evaluating a complex argument and deciding if you agree or solving everyday math problems, such as splitting the bill at a restaurant.

Visuospatial processing

VISUOSPATIAL PROCESSING

Visuospatial processing is the ability to effectively process and interpret visual information.

This ability is often used in scenarios such as creating art, drawing diagrams or interpreting subtle facial expressions to know how someone is reacting to what you are saying.

SPATIAL SHORT-TERM MEMORY

Spatial short-term memory is the ability to temporarily store spatial information in memory.

This ability is often used in scenarios such as navigating after getting directions from somebody, pointing on a map or drawing or building something you saw being created, like when following a YouTube tutorial.

VISUOSPATIAL SHORT-TERM MEMORY

Visuospatial short-term memory is the ability to temporarily hold spatial information in memory and manipulate or update it based on changing circumstances or demands,

This ability is often used in scenarios such as viewing a route on a map, following the route from memory, understanding positioning in sports and carrying out pre-planned plays.

ATTENTION

Attention is the ability to focus on relevant details or differences.

This ability is often used in scenarios such as staying focused on a task when it counts (like driving), identifying similarities and differences when comparing two things, or noticing small interpersonal details, like a partner’s haircut.

MENTAL ROTATION

Mental rotation is the ability to manipulate mental representations of objects in order to make valid conclusions about what objects are and where they belong.

This ability is often used in scenarios involving assembly (i.e. building a deck or putting together furniture) or planning a new layout for a room.

RESPONSE INHIBITION

Response inhibition is the ability to concentrate on relevant information in order to make a correct response despite interference.

This ability is often used in scenarios such as keeping your eyes on the road when driving, despite passing distracting signs or people or inhibiting your emotional gut reaction to a social media post to formulate a more rational response.

WORKING MEMORY

Working memory is the ability to temporarily hold information in memory and manipulate or update it based on changing circumstances or demands.

This ability is often used in scenarios such as systematically searching for a lost item in your home and remembering where you’ve already searched so that you do not search in that spot again.

VERBAL SHORT-TERM MEMORY

Verbal short-term memory is the ability to hold information in mind and verbally rehearse it for as long as necessary.

This ability is often used in scenarios such as understanding long sentences by remembering the beginning of the sentence by the time you get to the end, writing down a phone number or entering in credit card information from memory.

EPISODIC MEMORY

Episodic memory is the ability to remember and recall specific events, paired with the context in which they occurred.

This ability is often used in scenarios such as remembering which cupboard you put your groceries in, learning what each button does in a new app or device, or remembering who you talked to yesterday and at what time.

VERBAL REASONING

Verbal reasoning is the ability to quickly understand and make valid conclusions about concepts expressed in words.

This ability is often used in scenarios such as understanding complex everyday speech—e.g., “I didn’t know that he wasn’t going to show up.” or giving clear verbal or written instructions to people who report to you at work.